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5 Best Diet Plans Revealed by Health Experts

WEIGHT LOSS IS ONE OF MANY PEOPLE RESOLUTIONS FOR 2018!

But if you (me) are like any “average person” , it’s not always easy to start a diet plan,with a number of different diet options out there. Meanwhile you keep asking the same questions:Will this Diet plan suits my body? Will I starve while doing this diet?How long it will take till i start to burn fat and see first results?No Panic! You are behaving just like every human being that is willing to start a new challenge. This is why, we wrote you these 5 best Diet Plans that had been recommended by experts to get the results You Want!


But if you (me) are like any “average person” , it’s not always easy to start a diet plan,with a number of different diet options out there. Meanwhile you keep asking the same questions:Will this Diet plan suits my body? Will I starve while doing this diet?How long it will take till i start to burn fat and see first results?No Panic! You are behaving just like every human being that is willing to start a new challenge. This is why, we wrote you these 5 best Diet Plans that had been recommended by experts to get the results You Want!

5. Raw Foods Diet

The raw foods diet centers around the premise that cooking destroys nutrients, as well as enzymes found within each food, that are needed for digestion and disease prevention. For optimal health, all (or mostly all) foods should be consumed raw or below 115 degrees. Some raw food diet followers are vegans, eating only plant-based foods such as fruits, vegetables, nuts, seeds, grains, and legumes, while others add in a few animal-based products such as unpasteurized milk and cheese, raw fish, and some raw meat. Anything cooked, processed, pasteurized, irradiated, or in other words, not in its “natural state” is off-limits.

Advantages: The main positive that jumped out to me was not having to cook. But after thinking about it, I realized preparing raw food in different ways might be even harder – not to mention being unable to rely on convenience items when in a pinch. The only other positive I found was that the eating plan includes no added sugars, colorings, additives, or chemicals, and is low in sodium and high in potassium.

4. Ketogenic Diet

Think of the Ketogenic Diet as a low-carb version of an already low-carb diet, so low in carbs that most variations of the diet average only about 5 percent of calories from carbs – approximately 25 grams if eating around 2,000 calories. The goal of this diet is to put the body in a state of ketosis, something that’s suggested to increase the body’s breakdown of fat stores for energy due to a lack of glucose from carbohydrates. Meals are based around meats, poultry, fish, eggs, higher-fat dairy (like butter, cheese, and cream), healthy fats (like oils, nuts, seeds, and avocados), and vegetables that are low in carbohydrates (like green vegetables, tomatoes, onions, squash, peppers, etc.). All starchy vegetables, grains, fruits, dairy such as milk and yogurt, natural and refined sugars and sweeteners – or anything that would increase carb intake to above 5 percent of calories – should be avoided.

The Good: I was happy to see that most versions of the ketogenic diet encourage healthier cuts of animal proteins and the use of heart-healthy oils and fats – something that isn’t always done in low-carb diet plans. Another plus is the central role that vegetables play in almost every meal and snack. If a variety are chosen, then it’s likely one could get close to their recommended fiber and vitamin intakes. Lastly, ketosis suppresses appetite, something that could help with hunger and cravings, particularly if carb-heavy foods are an issue.

3. Alkaline Diet
Get ready to go back to high school chemistry class because the premise behind the alkaline diet is that foods impact the body’s internal pH level and that replacing acidic foods with more alkaline ones improves health and possibly prevents diseases like cancer. (As a quick refresher the pH scale ranges from 0 to 14; the more acidic a substance is the lower its pH value, and the more basic or alkaline a substance the higher its value.) The eating plan focuses on eating alkaline-promoting foods which include fruits, vegetables, beans, nuts, and seeds, and eliminating acid-promoting foods which include meat, poultry, fish, dairy, eggs, grains, and alcohol.

Advantages : The alkaline diet is a plant-based diet that’s centered around healthy food choices (unprocessed foods, fruits, vegetables, nuts, and beans) while limiting less healthy ones like animal protein, refined grains, and alcohol. For many individuals, simply making these types of food choices is a step in a better direction health-wise, as its typically lower in sodium, saturated fat, and sugar, and higher in potassium and fiber.

2. Dukan Diet

The Dukan Diet is a popular low-carb, high-protein eating plan that touts quick weight loss and no carb counting. The eating plan is divided into four stages with the first two being where weight loss occurs and the last two focusing on maintenance. Stage 1 lasts for 2 to 5 days and calls for eating only “natural pure protein foods” along with 1 ½ tablespoons of oat bran and lots of water. Stage 2 adds some low-carb vegetables in with protein foods. Once desired weight is reached, then Stage 3 and 4 slowly incorporate minimal amounts of fruits, starchy vegetables, and cheese. The high-protein foods encouraged include lean meats, lean pork, skinless poultry, fish, non-fat dairy, eggs, and soy proteins like tofu.

Advantages: If you’re a meat lover and you’ve got the financial means to buy lots of lean protein, then this may be an ideal eating plan for you. Two positive aspects in the Dukan diet are that it encourages regular exercise (something you don’t always see in low-carb plans) and that it provides followup with a maintenance plan, hopefully reducing the risk of regaining any weight lost.

1. Whole30

Think of Whole30 as a month-long eating reset where you focus on eating only whole, unprocessed foods and cutting out all added sugars, artificial sweeteners, alcohol, grains, most legumes and peas, soy products, dairy, and processed foods with certain additives. The Whole30 concept is based on the premise that our highly processed, modern diets trigger inflammation, hormone imbalances, and subtle food intolerances that may be having a cascading effect on health, as well as appetite and food choices. By eating “clean” for 30 days, an individual can then assess what foods they really miss, as well as identify potential effects that foods may have on their body when adding them back. Foods during the 30 days include all vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds (including nut milks and nut butters), eggs, fish, meat, poultry, and some oils and fats.

Advantages: For the most part, the food choices provide a framework for nutrient-dense, whole foods to become the focus of your diet. This eating plan isn’t called a weight loss plan, since the emphasis is more on restoring health and balance in the body, but most individuals do lose some weight. The guidelines also mimic what research suggests be done to reduce inflammation and chronic diseases risk. I’ve found a temporary “reset” with whole foods similar to this to be really helpful after eating periods of less healthy eating like after the holidays or vacation because 1) your body is usually craving whole foods at that point and 2) it’s usually eye-opening realizing how many chemicals, added sugars, and other less health components you’ve been consuming.


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